For critical-infrastructure entities, what is the best backup alternative when typical communications are unavailable?

Satellite
40% (73 votes)
Amateur radio
32% (59 votes)
Professional HF radio
20% (37 votes)
None of the above
8% (14 votes)
Total voters: 183

Discuss this poll 18

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

The best "backup' is the one that's been planned for and tested regularly.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

stand alone vhf systems that have multiple repeaters in a wide area of a state.
Usually thiis type of system has redundancy built in

on Jan 16, 2013

Define who is a "critical-infrastructure entity."

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

Amateur Radio operators have capabilities in multiple frequency bands that allow for local, regional and long distance communications. If a situation is local, VHF and UHF will provide a better communications option than HF. HF propagation is better suited for communications across a state or multiple states more so than within a local area.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

Even satellite saturates.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

Professional HF nets can connect pre-determined and pre-tested locations such as EOCs. But Amateur radio operators, (e.g. ARES) and their emergency "field day" kits can set up when and where public safety needs them, and communicate with EOCs and dispatch centers already VHF/UHF equipped.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

A cache of portables, mobiles and repeaters stored in an EMP and non-flood, non-fire secure environment.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

The question is very broad. In most cases, agencies should have redundancy built into their infrastructure, i.e. multiple frequencies.....This reduces the chance that the entire system would be wiped out. Even in the rural areas, ARES still plays a vital backup role.

Anonymous
on Jan 16, 2013

All Three should be used to their authorized limits.

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

Satellite is expensive and unreliable. Ham operators are cheap and dependable.

Anonymous
on Jan 30, 2013

How exactly do a handful of amateur radio hobbists provide communications for an entire city/county/region? How is this any different than just passing out a cash of emergency radios to existing employees? For professionals to be relying on hobbists for emergency communications is to admit to having no real plan at all.

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

1. Amateurs bring their own equipment (no cost to the entity)
2. Thousands of trained amateur operators available (no cost to the entity)
3. Frequency agile
4. Don't need permanent infrastructure
5. Can operate fixed, mobile, portable (allow radio resources to be deployed in a wide variety of situations)

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

There are not many or any, first responders, to which I consider critical infrastructure entities, at the street level who carries an amateur or any of the devices listed, live on the front-line of natural disaters on FL coast and we work hard to ensure the critcal links are entites has back up to back up plans and weak points addressed, doesnt everyone?

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

Time after time, when everything else has failed, amateur radio has been the first successful communications under these conditions. Example: Katrina, Space Shuttle Disaster in Texas, Joplin tornado

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

No two disasters are exactly alike and differences in topgraphy and size of the geograghical areas affected play a huge part on what does or will work best for an agency. We have found using analog conventional VHF equipment/systems are the best backup because activation/deployment is quick and we have very little reoccurring costs associated with maintaining a cache of portable radios and portable VHF repeaters.

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

Split U/V/700/800 interop channels in local areas for comms until systems are back up

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

Ham radio is the easier to rely on in times of need. You can have the most case hardened system and when it fails, you are out, period. Fail safe is as good as your tripple backup plans, ham radio should always be second in line.

Evans Mitchell
Kd4efm
Polk County, Fl.

Anonymous
on Jan 15, 2013

Private Two-way radio network.

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